Religion/Spirituality

Discussion in '-polls-' started by Berserk, Feb 9, 2013.

?

Which religion or spirtual path do you follow?

  1. None

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. Spiritual, not religious

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  3. Christianity

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Judaism

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Islam

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Hinduism

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. Buddhism

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  8. Paganism/Druidry

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  9. Wicca

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  10. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Sat Feb 9, 2013 3:37 pm

    I've been thinking about my own spirituality a lot the past few days, and it got me wondering about other people's experiences with spirituality and religion around here. Do you adhere to a religion or spiritual path? If so, which one? Feel free to elaborate.
     
    #1
  2. Cerceaux -tea party- -tea party-

    Cerceaux
    Joined: 14 Sep 2007
    Posts: 2539
    Location: Hell
    Posted: Sat Feb 9, 2013 5:17 pm

    I'm not voting until you add Mon+amour as a poll option. ::mana::
     
    #2
  3. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 12:11 am

    Catholic! :grin:

    This isn't really an explanation or anything, more of an aside, but I really love churches, church music, religious art, and the saints too! I suppose I love the Catholic culture in a way as well, especially in South America and Spain. Catholicism is such a part of my heritage and being in a way that I don't think, at least for me personally, I can be separated from it ever. This doesn't mean my relationship with it is always perfect or unchallenging however.

    Perhaps also because my elementary/middle school were some of the best years of my (still young) life--it was a really beautiful experience and I learned so much about myself. My parents are Catholic, but they aren't the type to go to church or do many things, so I didn't really have some super Catholic upbringing in that way with the exception of elementary/middle school where we went to church every Friday and took part in all the seasonal things. In high school we did much less, but I learned more about the history of the church and more about the beliefs, which is fascinating for me.

    My parents only taught me to pray, to do good, remember my roots, and be thankful for what I have, haha. I think we're all culturally Catholic though, if that makes sense. For example, my father has a Virgen de la Puerta statue from Otuzco that belonged to his mother, who I was named after and who prayed with the statue, and it's very important to us and he keeps her in mind when he quickly prays.

    As for me, I still pray and I've been going to church more often after I haven't gone in many years, and now even my mom is joining me! We've grown attached to the community in my neighborhood since then, especially with my volunteering at the church's food pantry for the homeless.

    My favorite saint is St. Augustine because he's such an inspiration for me! If he can become a better person I think anyone can, even me. Perhaps I'm too hard on myself, but when I read "Confessions" I felt as if I could finally relate to someone. Not only that, but he's such a great, passionate writer and I love his ideas. I still re-read parts of "Confessions," which is now an app on my iphone, haha. :) I'm so happy I was assigned to read him in my first semester of college!

    One of my friends at NYU told me about her conversion experience during our freshman year, and I couldn't believe how similar it was to St. Augustine's, I didn't even know what to say. It was such an intense story and I never would've suspected she had gone through all of that abuse and torment since she was little. She's such a different and better, happier person now, not suicidal or low in general, I'm really glad she found what she needed. ^^ It's amazing though, it's true that you never know what people are going through inside.
     
    #3
  4. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 3:26 pm

    ^^I'm not Christian, but I love Catholic art and architecture too. I think Roger Ebert summed it up well with this:
    I went to Catholic school from Preschool to 8th grade, and even though it was post-Vatican II it still left a cultural impact on me I think.

    I think it's really cool that your family has a religious "artifact" I guess you'd call it (or "heirloom"?), like that statue. Most Christians, especially Protestants, don't really include objects or art in their spiritual practices, but I think doing so can be an important part of the experience as well as help foster culture and heritage.

    It's interesting how basically everyone here but you (and now me, I guess) are in the "none" category XD I kind of already knew that, but it's still surprising when you see it represented in a bar chart. We really are a non-representative sample of people here ::meev::

    But the "nones" are one of the fastest-growing demographic groups, so you could say we're just ahead of the curve here at -Scape- :P

    In case you were wondering (though you probably weren't XD), I'll give a summary of my recent and sudden spiritual development: After visiting my professor's house this week and getting a glimpse of her pagan practices, something just really clicked for me. I had always assumed pagans were just Ren Fair types who took their LotR/D&D a little too seriously, but I was completely wrong. I took one look at the altar she built, and it made so much sense to me. It was like reading a foreign language for the first time, yet fully comprehending every word. After studying it more since then, I've felt like a void in my spiritual life is finally being filled, which is the last thing I ever expected myself to say. I became an atheist in 7th grade, disconnected from my spirituality, and assumed I would stay that way for the rest of my life. So this feels like the start of a new chapter, and I just can't stress enough how unexpected it is.

    I have so much more to learn about Paganism, and it will probably be a long time before I build a fully-formed, coherent practice for myself. But I'm really looking forward to the journey now. I normally feel so stressed about school/money/life, but now I feel so much more grounded and at peace with everything.

    I probably sound like a nut right now, but what can I say? It's all true.

    EDIT: I should clarify, I'm still an atheist. Though some Pagans do literally believe in their pantheon of gods, I'm more in the camp that treats them as symbols or metaphors. And I'm not Wiccan, so I don't believe in magic or an afterlife.
     
    #4
  5. flowersofnight -moderator- -moderator-

    flowersofnight
    Joined: 04 Aug 2004
    Posts: 12243
    Location: Vintage Live House, 1994
    Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 4:01 pm

    Berserk wrote:
    So what do you get out of it then?
     
    #5
  6. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 4:21 pm

    flowersofnight wrote:
    A stronger connection to nature, my ancestors, and those ineffable emotions and mental states that you could describe as "spiritual" experiences (even though science has proven they are physiological in nature). Pagan rituals involve a lot of close observation of plants and animals in the environment, as well as the use of them in crafting things like incense, dyes, tools, etc. or arranging them on an altar in meaningful ways so you can meditate or reflect on them more closely.

    Meditation, aromatherapy, yoga, and especially walks in the woods, etc., were things I enjoyed before discovering Paganism, but Paganism binds them together in a coherent way for me. It's a Gestalt for these practices that are already important to me, really, which is why it "clicked" so easily and suddenly I think. And learning from the organized community of Pagans will teach me even more about these practices so I can take them to the next level so-to-speak.

    Also, the thought of creating altars for deceased loved ones to meditate and reflect on appeals to me, though I've never done anything of the sort before. Usually when I reflect on a loved one that way, it happens while I'm lying in bed and there's no rhyme or reason to it. I would like a coherent outlet for these feelings as well as a way to honor and remember my relatives more thoroughly, and I think the ritual practices of Paganism will help me achieve that.

    Not that any of my deceased relatives would appreciate being remembered that way. I'm sure they would be completely mortified (npi) :lol:

    But hey, they're dead. I'm the one who's still kicking and dealing with these emotions, so I'll do it as I see fit :P
     
    #6
  7. Wandering_Fox -current- -current-

    Wandering_Fox
    Joined: 15 Dec 2004
    Posts: 3257
    Location: Sitting in the Cookie Chair
    Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:51 am

    I'm Catholic~ :grin: My dad is Presbyterian and my mom is Catholic, but I've always been more drawn to the Catholic mass than the Presbyterian service. I don't agree with *everything* they say, but I still consider myself a devout Catholic.
     
    #7
  8. MissUMana -member- -member-

    MissUMana
    Joined: 28 Nov 2008
    Posts: 2367
    Location: Far away
    Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:00 am

    Wandering_Fox wrote:
    Same here.

    I think it is a highly sexist religion (but then most -if not all- are) but I still think the message it delivers is beautiful and inspiring.
     
    #8
  9. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:53 pm

    I think one of the big takeaways in terms of cultural experience was the music and architecture. I grew used to dramatic choirs and beautiful Spanish colonial architecture and grand churches in general, since ours was an old beautiful Spanish church, and I became very proud of it. The churches in the US have nothing on the ones in Europe or Central and South America though, haha. Gawd, I love Catholic art too.

    Aw thanks! It's very pretty, Mary has a silver moon underneath her and she's wearing a light blue and gold crown with a light blue dress and she has pretty sparkling stones on her clothes.
    http://www.rpp.com.pe/pict.php?g=-1&p=/ ... 025259.jpg
    Like this but a mini version and in sky blue. I'd call it an heirloom too, it's the only thing I have of my dad's mother who I never met. Wow, that just suddenly gave it a lot of significance, haha. It's also interesting considering that my grandmother came from a very poor tiny town which even to this day doesn't have complete electricity, yet she had this beautiful statue.

    I think it's a South American thing, in general nearly every house there you'll have a painting/picture of Jesus Christ or a cross in the living room or something like that. And Mary is a very big deal. For my family I think we only have this statue. We also had two really small plastic statues of St. Rose of Lima and St. Martin de Porres (both Peruvian saints), but I'm not sure where they are since we've moved (they weren't as important). They might be at my maternal grandmother's house, which is full of religious antiques and things like that. She has a giant wall to wall painting of Machu Picchu XD

    I have a couple of prayer cards. The only one I know I have for sure is of St. Patrick since he was my elementary/middle school's name and so there's sentimentality there. The necklace I'm wearing now has written on the back St. Francis of Assisi's, "God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And wisdom to know the difference."

    LOL. OK this makes me sound hardcore! So there's your daily info about religious items in people's lives ::meev:: But I do think art in general adds to the experience and gives a visual, tangible impact.

    Not everyone voted though (LIKE MISSUMANA FOR EXAMPLE), but I know some Christians on here, but yeah, I'm not really surprised. I'm used to being surrounded by heathens. I can handle it.

    That's so nice! I'm excited for you! I think this is the first time you seem really excited about something. Good luck in everything you do! Maybe you can get more information from your professor as time goes on, I'm sure she'll have more advice to share, people to introduce you to, or answers to questions. But it's really nice when you can learn from someone like that right? The only reason right now that I look forward to returning to the US is to speak with my former professor because I had a sort of similar (although not religious or super sudden haha), "Oh my goodness!" experience in which I learned about myself and what I want to do in the future. So yeah, keep learning and I hope you find your path!
     
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  10. Sumire_hitsugi -member- -member-

    Sumire_hitsugi
    Joined: 13 Jan 2005
    Posts: 1445
    Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:58 pm

    Voted "none". Never felt the need to follow a religion and my parents never took me to church services when I was young. I remember one time in middle school some friends were talking about religion and I mentioned that I didn't believe in anything and I got looked at like I was some sort of alien. :roll:

    On occasion I do read about subjects like Buddhism and the various studies of demonology because they interest me, but not enough to turn me devout. Also don't have a problem with admiring church architecture and art or wearing themed clothing.
     
    #10
  11. Iskanderia -member- -member-

    Iskanderia
    Joined: 30 Jan 2007
    Posts: 2506
    Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 7:30 pm

    I don't believe in anything and haven't in like 20 years. I am dead inside.

    I went through a Wicca period the first couple years of high school because I apparently felt like I was missing something in the place where Christianity had been (I was never devout and I was never even baptized but I did believe in the Christian God).

    I thought maybe that since the pagan gods were older, they were truer but I got over that pretty quickly. Mostly I just enjoyed the rituals, so I can see where Berserk is coming from. I wish it didn't make me feel silly and I could still take part in it in some way. I'd probably be a happier person.

    Oh, wait, I was actually super depressed during that time. So maybe not.
     
    #11
  12. Kyuketsuki -dead scape- dead scape

    Kyuketsuki
    Joined: 27 Sep 2005
    Posts: 4429
    Location: 5 paces behind Seth with a pair of scissors....
    Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:19 am

    I'm Catholic, but I'm a weird sort of mesh of old-world and radically liberal catholicism (yes, there's such a thing oddly enough). Because my grandparents are european immigrants who are extremely centered around the church, and not just any version of the church but the English/French diocese (my poor grandfather's irish side got drowned out a bit by my grandmother's tradition-wise), that, crossed with the american standards, crossed again by a North/South (US) + Europe upbringing tended to put me in an unusual position. My dad always tried to present me with all the different ways of viewing this or that, and always welcomed when I had questions or mentioned contradictions I ran across. Often times he would agree with me on contradictions, but then usually ended with that despite the contradictions, which tend to to change and amend themselves as time goes on (where new ones will eventually take their place), it's better to adhere to the spirit of something instead, because in the end it's the spirit of it that counts and not necessarily man's current interpretation of it.

    Because of that, it's probably the only reason why I've been able to reasonably tolerate staying in the catholic church, because their bullshit is through the roof. But that spirit, the original intention of things, is essentially what I carry with me, and that has resulted in me recently favoring the original Tridentine Mass over this new-fangled post 1969 nonsense. ::meev:: I prefer attending this Latin mass for a slew of reasons, and most of them admittedly aesthetic, however these are the most important, I think:
    1. Latin/Tridentine mass allows less or no time for a priest to make a politically-charged tirade about this or that. So far I've only had to sit through one of these at a traditional mass- generally there's no time or readings become more important (as they should be, considering what the hell you're there for.)
    2. The air of importance is exponentially magnified in this version of the mass. The priest faces the altar, not the congregation. Incense is excessively used over everything and everyone. Everything, and I mean everything, is chanted. Everything. Compare this to today's Ordinary mass and you've just got some guy up there saying some stuff while people from the pews get up to badly butcher scripture and pray that the 'choir' doesn't break out into a folk song. It's like night and day between the two.

    Also, you know, because of the excessive age of the tridentine mass, occasionally fun references to dragons, unicorns, and other fanciful creatures get caught up in the hundreds-of-years-old chanting and you get to laugh a bit and facepalm at whatever medieval dude came up with all that. So, it becomes a fun lesson in history as well. You pick up some latin while you're at it.

    So, I suppose I pick and choose which bits of Catholicism I like and reject (sometimes openly- another reason why I don't like attending regular mass anymore. Self-restraint against stupidity is too hard sometimes.), and at the same time take a bit of pride in not just my own family history and tradition, but with the fact that, as crazy as the vatican might be at times, at least we aren't forcing Jesus or conversion on citizens of 3rd world countries in exchange for charity, and we are the last ones you will see on TV claiming the world is ending. That last bit I'm particularly proud of, especially since growing up in the perpetual-apocalyptic South. ::hora::


    @Pure_Elegance: Did your parents ever get you those little "Stories of the Saints" books?? When I was a kid I started to realize that the girls always died waaaay more violently than the boys, and then when I got older I noticed that, if you look reeeeeeeally closely at the portraits, if the saint had been run over with a spiked wheel there were little red dots going up them, or if their head had been cut off there was a red line across their neck, or if their hands had been cut off red lines around their wrists, etc. ::zetsubou:: ::zetsubou:: ::zetsubou:: I think these are them? Not sure: >click< I remember them being green, but I could just be going memory color-blind. ::meev:: I would still buy those books if I knew where and which ones I didn't have yet- you could have created compelling television from the stories and pictures alone, haha. ::erm::
     
    #12
  13. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:54 am

    Kyuketsuki wrote:
    My parents hardly did anything religious-wise other than what I mentioned (they were surprised when I randomly started going to mass again after so long XD) so no, they didn't buy me those books. I have a giant old Bible though passed down to me. I learned about the saints in school especially through our saint reports that we had to do, and I really liked reading about them. In high school I *loved* learning about all the councils, different schools of thought, more in depth about the sacraments/concepts and the saints, reforms and all that. Now in college I love learning about the Catholic Church in South America. It's all very complicated and grand. I didn't really notice a gender difference with the deaths though, especially when I think about St. Lawrence, St. Sebastian, St. John the Baptist, St. Peter, St. Maximilian Kolbe, St. Valentine, etc... not to mention all those martyrs in Roman times. Oh, another favorite of mine is St. Thomas More. ::squee::

    I always thought St. Lucy's portrait was creepy though since she always held her eyeballs in her hands. Egad.

    I like the normal masses that I've been to. I've never heard any politically-charged sermons, especially in the ones in New York. Those always make me laugh and lift my spirits. Father Peter is such a great guy, I feel really bad that he has leukemia. In Florida I never had politically charged ones either. In St. Patrick's I'd usually doze off or daydream unless we had a guest priest do the sermon. The cool music is where it's at. At Curley the sermons were nice especially coming from the archbishop.

    Call me a nerd but I've memorized a lot of what is said in mass and sometimes I'll jokingly say it when something frustrates me. Especially the part: "Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, happy are we who are called to his supper. Lord I am not worthy to receive you but only say the word and I shall be healed." XD Or maybe it's because I've always liked the story about Jesus healing the Roman centurion's servant.

    I heard recently that they changed some of the language and format of the mass (not sure if it's true), and maybe that's why I felt as if I couldn't follow (for once in my life) what was being said in mass.

    It's cool to see everyone's paths and stuff! :D
     
    #13
  14. Kyuketsuki -dead scape- dead scape

    Kyuketsuki
    Joined: 27 Sep 2005
    Posts: 4429
    Location: 5 paces behind Seth with a pair of scissors....
    Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:04 am

    PureElegance wrote:
    Well, Florida's an honorary northern state, after all... :roll: ;)

    The religion/political cross-overs get very nasty and there's a lot of bleed-through in the bible-belt. It's extremely unfortunate. I spent many an amused day on my own, public, secular university being bombarded with billboard-sized images of dead fetuses and 'pastors' standing on our half walls telling us that all of us were going to hell. Sometimes with megaphones. I have also seen a handful of Krishnas and exactly one Mooney as well- those were actually extremely funny for me to see after hearing so many stories from my dad about those sects in NYC in the '70s. ::gaku:: ::cop::

    But yeah, it's really hard to get away from if you live in the bible belt.

    And it's kinda too bad you never had them!! D: If only for the "why would you give this to young children??" factor, haha. Well, if you wander into any catholic bookstores when you find your way back to the states, definitely go look for them- they're a depressing kind of fun. You will appropriately find them in the kids' section usually. ::mana::

    I actually found this site that has some of the stories from one of the books, along with the pictures, but the picture quality is *so* degraded that you can't make out any of the blood in them. ::erm:: Ah well. ::kisaki::
     
    #14
  15. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2013 12:22 pm

    Kyuketsuki wrote:
    I guess our saint reports made up for it though, I had to learn about them through internet research, so I knew about the horrible deaths XD I like reading about this stuff though. I just can't look away! I think you worded it correctly, it's a "depressing kind of fun." For example, last week I spent hours reading the "actors who committed suicide" section on Wikipedia XD

    I wouldn't characterize ALL of Florida as a northern state (I don't want it to be seen as "northern" anyhow), but northern Florida is more Southern in the Bible Belt sense while South Florida (where I'm from) is a strange mix and is mostly Hispanic, Cuban, European, Caribbean, etc. I think South Florida is pretty religious in its own way, but I don't think there are railing priests or anything like that, not that I've seen. The only weirdness I saw was in high school from one teacher specifically.
     
    #15
  16. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 12:48 am

    Wow, a lot has been posted! I actually didn't expect much of a response. It's interesting to hear everyone's different experiences!
    PE wrote:
    Thanks! :)
    Iska wrote:
    Yeah, I've seen some Pagans do some facepalm-worthy things, so I understand. The nice thing about Paganism, though, is that there is no institution or gospel that says you have to practice it one way or another--it's very "build your own adventure" lol. So that aspect allows me to be like "no, that's dumb" to some stuff and add some things to my practice that other Pagans don't care about or have never thought of.

    But Wicca is a very different branch of Paganism than what I'm studying, and I'm less familiar with it. The impression I got about Wicca is that it does have some structure and rules to it, less than maybe a traditional religion but quite a bit more than other types of Paganism. I could be wrong, though. Wicca is also by far the most popular branch of Paganism, which is interesting (it's the largest non-Christian faith in the US Air Force! lol). I should probably learn more about it for that reason alone.

    @Kyu: Now I wish I had experienced that kind of mass before! I've been to services where the priest sprinkled us all with his scepter of holy water (I don't remember what it's called lol. My grade school teachers would be ashamed), but I never experienced the use of incense or Latin at all.

    @PE: I had to look up St. Lucy since you said that XD. Aside from her gruesomely interesting Oedipal situation there, I thought it was cool that Germanic celebrations of St. Lucy's day retain a lot of pagan tradition.

    Which reminds me: while a lot of other languages refer to the celebration of Christ's resurrection as "Pâque", "Pascua", "Pascha", etc., the English word "Easter" is literally the name of the Germanic Pagan goddess of spring. It's amazing how many Pagan practices have endured over the millennia. Many are hiding in plain sight.
     
    #16
  17. PureElegance -eternite- eternite

    PureElegance
    Joined: 05 Jul 2006
    Posts: 4655
    Location: In Klaha's Closet
    Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 5:16 am

    Berserk wrote:
    You're not missing much *gag* XD I think I mentioned before how it gets to ridiculous levels sometimes at the church I currently go to. I don't like incense in general but they overdo it at times to make me truly hate it, haha.

    LOL I like how eyeballs made you look her up! Check out this really cool painting:
    http://uploads8.wikipaintings.org/image ... y-1748.jpg
    I love the details in that one (bottom right corner). That's serious devotion, yo!

    St. Agatha's are usually more gruesome since she had her breasts cut off, but usually she just has her hands on her chest or is holding her breasts on a platter. this one is kind of pretty, ok OW, and here this one isn't bad
    I really like religious art and the symbolism, for example St. Lucy always holding her eyes. St. Augustine is almost always with a book and a flaming heart because of, "You touched me, and I am set on fire to attain the peace which is yours." St. Martin de Porres is usually holding a broom and always has a bird, mouse, and a cat eating from the same plate, haha.

    One of the things that annoyed me about some of these deaths was that they were brought on not only by the general Christian persecutions at the time, but by men who were upset that women like St. Agatha and St. Lucy wouldn't marry them, so they had them denounced as Christians. Come on! St. Agnes had to be the biggest example of this. I remember when I was little and doing my little reports how annoyed I got when reading their stories. I distinctly remember being upset with St. Barbara's story and how all of Jesus' disciples (except John) were killed in horrible ways ::kisaki::
    (if you want to get depressed, Archbishop Oscar Romero's assassination while he was celebrating mass is something to read. Even during his funeral bombs were set off and 30-50 people were killed and no one was ever prosecuted for any of it. Only 30 years later did the president give an apology saying that state agents were probably involved back then.)

    And St. Lawrence was grilled alive! It's amazing though how you can see these saints' relics and objects to this day.
     
    #17
  18. Iskanderia -member- -member-

    Iskanderia
    Joined: 30 Jan 2007
    Posts: 2506
    Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 1:34 pm

    @Berserk: the reason wicca is the most popular branch of paganism, of course, is because of "majick."

    "You mean all I have to do to get this girl to love me against her will is to burn these herbs, light a pink candle and scream her name at the full moon?? That's totally cool and not at all rapey!"

    Luckily it doesn't work. (I never tried a love spell but I did some other less creepy spells and eventually I was like lol this is all bullshit and just started meditating).
     
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  19. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:55 pm

    @PE: But I do like incense (I think I did a poll on that here and I was like the only one who did XD), so maybe I would still enjoy it! I would go to one one of these days just to learn more about it, but I feel uncomfortable being the only person who doesn't take Communion. Also, I feel like a hypocrite crossing myself with holy water and genuflecting when, you know, I'm a heathen ::transform::

    I think it's kind of ironic that so many saints were martyred by Pagans (all Roman Pagans, I think), when so soon afterwards the tables would be turned and "witches" would be burned at the stake by Christians. I'm so glad we're past that crap now :roll:

    I wish we had as good of records of Pagan martyrs as the Catholics do of their saints. I mean, if the Catholic saints are any indication, I'm sure their stories would be pretty damned interesting.

    @Iska: I was afraid of that. I didn't want to make assumptions, though, because I know there are lots of misconceptions and bad judgments about Paganism floating around. It seems odd that so many full-grown servicemen and women would be into it for that reason, though, doesn't it?

    My sister knew a witch in high school who would cast spells on people who crossed her. Apparently a lot of the kids believed it too, and she really freaked them out. To me that's all about teenage angst and getting a rise out of people and has nothing to do with a real spiritual practice. I hope most full-grown Wiccans practice for reasons other than that.
     
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  20. Berserk -member- -member-

    Berserk
    Joined: 13 Apr 2006
    Posts: 2383
    Location: Michigan
    Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:18 pm

    Sorry for the double post, but PE, I found some great stories related to King Olaf I of Norway! :lol:

    These would be Pagan "saints", if we had any:
    The story of Raud the Strong wrote:
    The story of Sigrid the Haughty wrote:
    I'll have to research more, this is pretty awesome.
     
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